Finding Ancient Egyptian Curiosities in Niagara Falls

Located on the US-Canada border about a 1.5 hour drive from Toronto, Niagara Falls has become a well-visited tourist destination for anyone coming to Canada`s largest city. Last week, Hannah and I decided on a whim to spend a night in the city with its majestic falls. For Egyptologists, of course, Niagara holds special significance as the mummy of Ramesses I used to call the city home for over 100 years (1). He ‘lived’ in the Niagara Falls Museum until late 1999, when the Egyptian collection of the museum was purchased to become part of the Michael C. Carlos Museum in Atlanta, Georgia. The mummy would eventually be returned to Egypt to great pomp and circumstance. Niagara lost perhaps its most famous resident…

Looking at the Interior at the museum from the late 19th century (Niagara Falls Museum)
Looking at the Interior at the museum from the late 19th century (Niagara Falls Museum)

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Ramesses II and Vancouver’s Heb-Sed: Remembering Expo ’86

When a pharaoh neared 30 years of rule, it was commonly expected that he would prove his right and ability to rule through a series of trials. In an example from Saqqara dating to ca. 2,800 BC, Djoser is shown in striding fashion within his burial complex. The King here is celebrating his 30 years of rule: the famous heb-sed celebration. Nearly 5,000 years later, ancient Egypt is still very much present in the thoughts of the modern world.

Continue reading “Ramesses II and Vancouver’s Heb-Sed: Remembering Expo ’86”